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Showing posts from April, 2018

Arginine and its Derivatives in Cognitive Impairment

Source: Epiphany ASD Blog
Today�s post is very relevant to dementia, relevant to schizophrenia and diabetes and I believe some autism, including that of my son; agmatine is part of his Polypill therapy. Arginine is highly versatile amino acid and you need the arginine metabolism to be working correctly, particularly in your brain. Arginine is a widely available from diet and can be produced from citrulline and indirectly from glutamine; so you are unlikely to be deficient in arginine, except in your brain and particularly if you have Alzheimer�s. In Alzheimer�s it has been shown that the microglia in effect destroy arginine in the brain and this may play a role in what initiates the disease. Research has suggested that a deficiency in polyamines, another derivative of Arginine, is a feature of dementia. A deficiency of arginine in the brain will likely cause a deficiency of polyamines.

Your body needs nitric oxide to maintain a healthy blood pressure and this requires arginine to follow the…

Modulation of IP3 receptors in Autism � Pancreatitis and Caffeine?

This post stems from our Greek reader Petra's original observations about the combined effects of coffee and bumetanide.

In earlier posts we learned that one likely nexus in autism is the IP3 receptor that releases calcium from a store within each cell.

It turns out that too little/too much activity from IP3 receptors is a feature of a wide range of disease, some of which you may not have heard of, including:-
�Gillespie syndrome, a genetic condition leading to MR/ID, ataxia and notably part of the iris to be missing
�Spinocerebellar ataxias, genetic conditions that cause loss of movement control
�Glioblastoma, an aggressive and �untreatable� brain cancer
�Alzheimer�s disease
�Huntington�s disease
�Pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas where your body makes its digestive enzymes and insulin
For detail, refer to this Japanese paper:-

IP3 receptor mutations and brain diseases in human and rodents
Of the three types of IP3Rs, the type 1 receptor (IP3R1) is dominantly expressed in the brain…